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's america. greg? >> andy, can you blame people in obama's america not wanting to run with the bulls? >> i am just surprised the bulls want to come here what with obamacare and all. >> exactly. >> and you can only use 49 bulls in assisted of 50. >> i think there are 58 bulls. >> eight won't be eligible for health care. >> enough of this. look who is here. she is so british her blood type is marmalade. i am here #w* imogen lloyd webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries" and if hilarity was a soap dispenser they would pump him in the office bathroom. he is writer examine comedian jake fogelnest. bill schulz is out of town and filling in is my nude rock climbing instructor, michael moynahan. glad you combed your hair. and he is not allowed within 50 feet of a hot air balloon. next to me, america's future foundation. that's not magestic. camille foster. >> a block. the lede. that's the first story. get ready for an hour's worth of tmi. >> will he be less graby after time and rehaby? well san diego mayor bob filner has started two weeks of intensive therapy as he faces calls for his
in his book, i try to love america. but i cannot love things. no one in good health can. imagine a world of material wealth is devoid of people. i try to love america and its people, the dominant majority, their depiction of me and their treatment of mine. i have had to try to love america but they would not love the african whole of me. thus i could not love america. i have come to know that i have tried to love america's ideals and promise and process. these things could mean no more to me than they have to those that conceived them were written on were cited and ultimately betrayed them. then i stopped trying to love america. with that has come a measure of unexpected contentment that is settled upon me like an ancient ceremonial robe, warm and splendid, mislead but valued all the more for its belated retrieval. randall robinson, thank you for being with us. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> on this week's newsmakers, dana rohrabacher. he's chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on europe, eurasia, and emerging threats. we discussed a variety of foreign policy topics
foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28th, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a cream "dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis. >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviol
talked to him on the program in depth. this is three hours. >> host: what does america owe blacks? >> guest: well, it owes them an acknowledgment of what happened. we don't like to talk about that in the states. even blast history month. there's a truncated version of what woodson had in mind. now it starts in slavely and moves forward and cuts us all from any access to african history. which was not what woodson intended. and so we obviously owe the value of our hire to those people who suffered so much and their families who dissented from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owe them something for that. we owe them the story. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good sound, psychology health. ashes and obliterated history. when i was a dmield richmond, virginia, we used to have a phrase that we used all the time from here to tim. but nobody knew what it was. nobody knew the providence of the world. didn't know where it was. didn't know it was a place. tim buck, which was a cross roads. it was also a site of one the world's first university. a
. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google
and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about 600 people, black and white, many young people, some people who had just left church, decided to march from
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
-of-the-europeans, for instance, theirability to influence that is limited. and the social function much america's diminishing influence throughout the middle east. one of the reasons the gulf states radio angry with the united states not only because of what happened today in egypt. it's because they see the president is weak on iran, weak on syria and israeli settlements and now they feel -- >> all of the leff village gone. >> and now they are stepping in and they have the means to do it. >> thank you both very much. >> thank you. >> online we have a map that shows where all u.s. military aid guess. still to come on "the news hour," al-jazeera america has its debut. same sex marriage in the states. the dolphins day at the white house. and lyme disease on the rise. first the eerp news of the day. >> pakistan's former president the some point in time be was smrmt there to -- weep have a report narrated by john gla armed personnel were stationed around the courthouse. this was not a moment that mush would treasure. he seemed reluctant to get out of his vehicle. but the country's former military ruler had littl
on washington, has been credited for changing mainstream america, white america's view of the civil rights movement and the fight against segregation. is this your experience? do you think that's true? >> i do believe that's true, not because of correspondents who were covering it but because of the nature of the times, the development of television, the pervasive use of television. television was just coming into most homes in the late '50s and '60s, been around before then. but there's no question that television's coverage of the civil rights movement, taking into people's living rooms what was happening, not some newspaper description or some highly censored or sanitized view, it brought the reality of the viciousness of the opposition to civil rights, particularly in the deep south, into people's living rooms. and then the eloquence and courage of dr. king and those who worked with him, such as john lewis, now a congressman, people could see and hear for themselves. television was the instrument. before television it was easy to deny how much violence there was. it was easy to overloo
, but also america's core self interests. >> the army major convicted of killing 13 people at fort hood in texas has been sentenced to die. nadal hassan was sentenced earlier today. that sentence will be automatically appealed. >> on the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech, thousands gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement
, d.c. to share my thoughts on what i think we need to focus on in public education in america. >> thank you. thank you, joe. >> i am a product of forced busing for racial equality. i take you back to the '70s, where diversity was a word that was foreign to america, but it was the future. i take you to birmingham, alabama, last night, where i did a radio town hall and i can tell you what's happening in america right now. the dream can only be realized if we pay attention to what's going on in our own backyard. when we start picking and choosing neighborhoods, who's going to get the resources and who's not going to get the resources, we will lose this country, we will lose the vision of diversity, we will lose the opportunity of equality to move all people forward. you need to pay attention to what's happening in your backyard to make sure that your school and those young kids get the resources they need to have an opportunity in america that will help them grow. being a product of the middle class, i was the one that was afforded the opportunities. and if we start picking and c
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
lyons recounts the introduction of the enlightenment to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its development. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. [laughter] that's always good to hear a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, my wife and i have only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we're based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and i'll probably always miss, and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book and most of my three earlier books as well. but i know that quality of life and the quality of discourse, particularly civic discourse, will be greatly improved. [laughter] and i know, also, that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that i'm speaking here tonight, and he would commend this institution on its civic-mindedness. franklin was known as a projector, that is he loves social projects, and
>>> good morning, america. this morning, inside the fire zone. we're on the front lines of the all-out battle to contain the giant wildfire raging in yosemite national park. how this fire is creatings it own weather and now jeopardizing rows of giant sequoias, the symbols of the park system. >>. ♪ when will i hide below >> a singer silenced as linda ronstadt says she has parkensons. why she can no longer sing, and why it took eight years to diagnose nose. >> cry for help, a boy hearing robbers breaking in and alls 911. >> i'm going to have to whisper because they are coming here. >> what the dispatcher told him to do next. >>> and the running of the bulls comes to america. this morning, the backlash and the thousands of adrenaline junkies in virginia who decided to go for it anyway. >> good morning, america! >> from abc news, live from new york, this is "good morning america" with dan harris and bianna golodryga. >> good morning on this very busy sunday. we want to get to the top story this morning, the wildfire raging into yosemite national park. >> morning, it's threatening hom
. >> democracy is at its best when they all have a seat at the table. but in america there's a big gap. we need more women in office. >> men hold 82% of the seats in the house of representatives. a decade ago, our nation ranked ninth 57 nations as a percentage of women in congress. today we are 92nd. out of 50 governors come just five are women. that's 10%, the same percentage as the number of women mayors in the 100 largest cities. out of more than 7000 state legislators, fewer than one in four are women. that's barely higher than it was two decades ago. at this rate women will be underrepresented in the united states for another 500 years. a century ago in 1920, the decades long struggle for women to win the righ right to vocal e in the 19th amendment to the constitution. inspired by that struggle, representation 2020 takes on this centrist challenge for women. we must have parity for women in office. that will happen when any given election a woman is just as likely as a man to win and in any given legislature, women will be just likely told them. i founded the white house project where we t
bombing bow- toy business. you will want to meet mo. america's news headquarters starts right now. hello, everybody. we begin with what has everyone talking this woke week. a global warning from the state department. two dozen consulates will be closed tomorrow because of a massive terrorist threat. some are questions about the timing and how the administration is handling this. molly is joining us live. >> president obama we are learning was briefed on the potential al-qaeda terrorist threat and there is two prongs of how the obama administration is handling the terror attack. warning all americans about international travel spectacularly in the midoast and north africa. and two embassies and consulates will close as a precaution. tomorrow is also president obama's birthday and the now president of iowa ran is supposed to be worn in. before the president left to play golf he got an update and he will get additional updates throughout the woke week. the embassies and consulates that will close will stretch from eastern africa to bangladesh. the u.s. picked up increased chatter that a ter
to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its develop and. this is a little over one hour. >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. it's always good to get a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, i wife and i only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we are based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book, most of my three or their books as well. but i know the lord of life and quality of discourse will be greatly improved. and i know also that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that if speaking here tonight and that he would commend this institution on its civic mindedness. franklin was what was known as a projector. he loves -- loud projects, social projects. knowledge was a social activity and that was exemplified by the program get here at town hall. i do have to say one thing. i think he would probably frown
jobs overseas. >> the complaint is that we don't have jobs here in america. but the fact is labor is cheaper overseas. and youth unemployment here. minimum wage jobs in mcdonalds and entrow level position are necessary for high school and college students to get a to the in the work force. if you start raising that cost and making them more expensive, employees will not hiring then. there is a 17 percent youth unemployment rate. we'll see it go up. >> hold on, ju know. in your city alone, there is a walmart law where they want to increase the wage for walmart. there is a 34 percent unemployment rate in teens in washington d.c. and you box them outine more from jobs they need. >> wait a second, if you are talking about mcdonald, the average worker is 28. not teenagers. and second eric you and wayne will have to get in corporate jets to go to mcdonald and send those jobs overseas. that's what wayne is saying. >> no, let's be honest here. one more thing eric, you want us to bring third world wages. >> what are you talking about. >> my corporate jet was built overseas. >> there we go.
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
american community. liberalism nearly destroyed black america. now it's time for black america to return the favor. >> greta: hi specter. the growth at the gate. just me. >>> hello, eric bolling with kimberly guilfoyle, bob beckel, dana perino, and brian kilmeade. it is 5:00 in new york city. this is "the five." as the summer races forward, so does the race debate in america. stand your ground gave way to stop and frisk, now "the butler" hottest movie of the summer has a director that says america is more racist since president obama took office than before. more on that in a moment. first, we know the zimmerman trial ended weeks ago. i was stunned when i saw a brand new political attack ad which reenac reenacts the night trayvon martin crossed paths with george zimmerman. it is dramatic, provocative, is it fair. before we show the ad, we must warn you it is dramatic. beware if you have kids, especially younger kids watching. >> are you following him? >> yeah. >> okay, we don't need you to do that. >> okay. all right, sir, what is your name? >> george. >> he is yelling help? >>
-jazeera america sports. [[voiceover]] no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. can you say stocktopussy? there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, could striking workers in greece delay your retirement? i'm here to make the connections to your money real. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> welcome back. i am stephanie sy. these are our stories at this hour. >> the wildfire in yosemite national spark threatening the power grid prompting the governor of california to declare an emergency. t >>> the suspected chemical attack has the u.s. considering possib
>>> good morning, america. and breaking overnight, flash flood emergency. midwest towns evacuated as the water rises four feet in two hours. a 4-year-old swept away. a desperate search for victims. there are watches and warnings in ten states. >>> and the sole survivor. the firefighter from the band of hot shot brothers who fought that lethal wildfire in arizona where 19 lost their lives. the moment when he realized they were all trapped and lost. >> i hear phones ringing, knowing it was their wives, their families. >> the abc news exclusive. >>> is he breathing? is he breathing? he's breathing, yes, ma'am. >> and breaking details of the shocking pool emergency for usher's young son. trapped under water in the powerful suction of a swimming pool drain. what everyone needs to know right now about the danger in the pool. ♪ i'm on the edge of glory >>> and breaking free. the jaw-dropping daredevil stunt, handcuffed in a locked coffin, pushed out of a plane. how he broke free. we'll talk live to the stuntman behind this epic escape, only on "good morning america." >>> good morning,
soon get involved. and emirates new zealand is now just a win away from advance to go the america's cup final against team oracle usa. what stopped the kiwis >> knew this morning, authorities in floor are investigating just what led a trucking company employee to go on a shooting spree that left two former colleagues dead and two others injured. according to police, the 72-year-old hubert allen junior shot them yesterday at several locations around union county, florida. authorities say allen first shot and killed a 28-year-old former coworker, then went a short distance and fatally shot his 80-year-old former boss. later he shot and wounded two other men before going home and killing himself. >>> new this morning, ousted egyptian president hosni mubarak will be in court today to face retrial in connection with the killing of protesters back in 2011. he was flown by helicopter to a military courthouse this -- from a military hospital to a courthouse this morning. mubarak was released from prison and transferred to house arrest in the hospital. mubarak was found guilty last year for fail
on the country did states of america coming out of the closet and singing here is how i think the social war should be taught. should be taught in terms of people understanding on what would have happened if the war turned out differently. >> up next on the special weeknight edition of book tv. author national book award winning author nathaniel philbrick -- he discusses this in massachusetts for 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. it's an honor to be introduced by a fellow nantucketer both of our kids were educated by them and it is great to see you here in brookline and it's wonderful to be in the coolidge center theater with this great bookstore and co-sponsored with the massachusetts historical society, which has been an institution that has been absolutely essential to my life as a historian. i sometimes sort of feel like i've taken up residence in the archives there, and every book i've done there has been a central information that has come from there but among the more so than bunker hill. one of the characters i delve into, the papers are there at what we call the mhs and it is an
to new york and good morning america. lynette charles is is standing by as we continued and you have stressed we may not be out of the woods for the day. >> so we have the round this morning and we have not had the cold front move through. once that slides through a little later we can see another round of the clashing of the air masses possibly more severe weather. >> all right. as you can find out the latest on this going to abc2news.com and bc2an and twitter and storm shield app and take advantage and we will stay on the story throughout the course of the day bringing outmost accurate information that we know now to new york be safe out there. jon karl from the white house. >> reporter: a clear sign she has not retired from politics. hillary clinton gave her first major policy speech since stepping down as secretary of state. and made it clear there's much more to come. she's back. in a speech before the american bar association, hillary clinton announced she plans to give a series of big policy speeches in the coming months. monday night, she addressed voting rights and racial di
will be right back after this. ,,,,,,,,,, [ superfan ] we're hitting the road to help america discover the new helper. you've got to try this sweet & sour chicken helper. i didn't know they made chicken. crunchy taco or four cheese lasagna? can i get another one of those actually? [ superfan ] hey, america, we're here to help. ♪ too small. too soft. too tasty. [ both laugh ] [ male announcer ] introducing progresso's new creamy alfredo soup. gets hurt?? the 49ers aren't sure >> we talked about this. this is a huge potential problem. >> right, who is the backup to the starting 49ers quarterback, colin kaepernick? what happens if he goes down? they signed wallace to a one- year contract. he was released by the saints earlier this week and the sacramento native will compete with cole mccoy, cj daniels for the number one job. new raider running back rashad jennings who signed to be back up, showed his inner southern gentleman when the virginia native found $20 at an atm in san francisco. >> somebody just lost $20. i know they felt sick. so i went to the restaurant and i said excuse me, sir, is a
here, representing the rule committees. i want to tell everybody in america, tom cole is a reasonable member of this house. he's been a leader of this house. he wants to seek common ground in my view. so i do not criticize him but i say, mr. speaker, as you tap the gavel, time is not only running out on steny hoyer, time is running out on this house, time is running out on erica, time is running out americans who know their house is not working and now i yield back the balance of my time but we should not yield the balance of time for the american people and for our country. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has no time to yield back. the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from oklahoma is recognized. mr. cole: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. cole: my friend, and he is my friend is really one of the great speakers in this chamber. i mean that with all sincerity. but this isn't the senate. we don't have unlimited debate over here. kind of stretching it a little bit. but it's alway
guess, in america who knows exactly how brett, hanna's father has been feeling in the last week. obviously, a very happy ending to this, as indeed, it was in your case, but tell me how you feel about what he's going through and what add voice you would give them as a family going forward? >> well, you know, you're on this roller coaster certainly with the death of his wife and son that had to be, i would almost say catastrophic, and then to not know whether your daughter was still alive or not for a period of time, you know, we had that roller coaster effect emotionally that, you know, we would hear that a body had been found or a burned body or bones or, you know, any type of scenario out there, and certainly, that that puts you on an emotional roller coaster to get the word that your child is still alive is, you know, there is no other word than miracle that comes to mind, and certainly, a wonderful day in the midst on a total night mare. we haven't heard how dimaggio may have manipulated her. fortunately, you know, he's no longer around for her sake, and i'm hoping that with
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
strides america has made on race since the darkest days of the civil rights era. and also acknowledging their there is much more that can and must be done. we will go live to the washington monument in just a few minutes. we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital where president obama has been holding a meeting that could have phonily major implication as he and his national security team discuss reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria. and at an investigation that could soon lead to some kind of u.s. military response. hello. i'm kelly wright. welcome to a brand new hour of "america's news headquarters." >> i'm heather chillders. u.n. investigators arrive on the ground to try to get access to the scene of that horrific alleged chemical attack. and as we learn that the navy is actually pre-positioning some of its warships in preparation for the president's decision. it seems the debate over america's role in this crisis could be coming to a dramatic end. >> the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ballistic missiles into the eastern mediterranean sea accordin
. we'll see you next week. >>> hello. glad you're with us and welcome to a new hour of america's news headquarters. >> good to see you all. topping the news this hour, thousands commemorating the march on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be
constellation tour. it is the last ship built in 1954 by the u.s. navy. heritage action of america held a town hall meeting in wilmington delaware. it is the last in a series of defundingsupport the the affordable care act law. >> hello, delaware valley. it is so great to be with you. i am part of the team at heritage action. the opportunity to be here in the first state is very exciting for all of us. thank you for the warm welcome. [applause] as you know, this is a nine city true -- nine city tour about defunding obamacare across the nation. we decided that delaware and the surrounding areas are important because weme to agree with vice president biden. this bill is a big deal. it must be defunded. [applause] last night, we were in pittsburgh. we were talking to them after the program was over and they were talking about how great the pirates were doing. that is exciting for those of you that are pirates fans. they told us to give you a hard time about how they are doing better than the phillies. i told them we would have to be careful about that because the eagles have done better in the pr
of america's news headquarters. >> good to see you all. topping the news this hour, thousands commemorating the march on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to
. the running of the bulls has come to america. and not everybody is cheering. abc's susan sellny has more. >> up to now, if you felt like running for your life hoping not to be gored to death by thousand pound bulls, it meant taking a trip to pamplona, spain. that was then, this is now. look closely. those are not the cobblestone streets of an ancient village. the dust being kicked up is on a racetrack in dinwoody, virginia, where an american version of the spanish spectacle has begun in a big way. it's the great bull run and may be coming to a town near you. >> can't wait, i'm excited. crazy adrenaline rush. >> when the bulls come out, i didn't know what to do. ran straight, turn around and ran into people. >> reporter: adventure seekers are signing up for upcoming events in atlanta, houston, dallas, chicago and other cities. >> everybody is going to see this, i can do that, run with the bulls, it's going to take off nationwide. >> reporter: but that's not without controversy. even the organizers recognize that bull running is inherently dangerous. this morning, two runners are recoverin
, everybody, i'm martha maccallum here in "america's newsroom." what a story this is. gregg: incredible courage. i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. listen to the hero of this story. her name is antoinette toff. she came face-to-face with the shooting suspect, michael brand done hill. >> oh i'm in the front office. he went outside to start shooting. [gunfire] can i run? >> can you get somewhere safe? >> yeah. i got to go. and he's coming back. >> put the phone down. >> okay. she said she is getting police to tell him to back off for you, okay? >> tell them to stop all movement. >> okay. okay. >> stop all movement now on the ground. stop all movement on the ground. he said don't care if he die. he have nothing to live for. he says he is not mentally stable. >> stay on the line with me. okay? put the phone down if you have to but don't put it on hold so i can't hear. martha: she not only calms him down but then she speaks to the police and becomes a intermediary in this situation. she convinces him to give himself up before hurting anybody. listen to this part. >> let me talk to them an
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